Black/New Afrikan Liberation

Abdul Maumin Khabir

Maumin was accused by the U.S. government of being an El Rukn general and "terrorist," and was sentenced to life in prison under RICO laws.  Originally designed to allegedly combat organized crime, RICO laws are being used to attack individuals, movements and organizations that don't subscribe to the political objectives of the U.S. government.  Prior to and since his capture, Maumin had been working to develop ties within the Republic of New Afrika, much during extensive travel in Africa.

Edward Pinkney, Rev.

On December 15 2014, Rev. Edward Pinkney, a leader in the struggle for social and economic justice for the residents of Benton Harbor, Michigan, was sentenced to serve 3 to 10 years in prison, on the basis of thin circumstantial evidence that a few dates had been altered on a recall petition against the city's mayor, James Hightower. The recall was prompted by the mayor's continued support for tax evasion by the Whirlpool Corporation, the Fortune 500 company and $19 billion global appliance manufacturer, headquartered in Benton Harbor. He was arrested on April 25, 2014.

Ronald Reed

Ronald Reed is a former 60s civil rights activist. In 1969, Reed was also among the students at St. Paul Central High School who demanded black history courses and organized actions against racist teachers. He was also instrumental in helping to integrate college campuses in Minnesota. During this period, Reed began to look toward revolutionary theory and began to engage in political street theater with other young black revolutionaries in the city of St. Paul.

Jalil Muntaqim

Jalil became affiliated with the Black Panther Party at age 18.  Less than 2 months before his 20th birthday he was captured with Albert Nuh Washington in a midnight shootout with San Francisco police. He was subsequently charged with a host of revolutionary activities including the assassination of two police in New York City. It is for this that he is currently serving a 25 years – life sentence in New York State. His case is known as the New York 3 case as his co-defendants include Nuh Washington and Herman Bell.

Robert Seth Hayes

Seth Hayes is a member of the Black Panther Party and the Black Liberation Army, he was framed and convicted of murdering a NYC police officer in 1973. He was charged with seven counts of attempted murder and one count of murder in the first degree.  He has repeatedly been denied parole, not based on his record in prison but because of his political beliefs and work with the Black Panther Party. 

Personal Background

Veronza Bowers

Personal Background

Veronza Bowers Jr. is a former Black Panther Party member framed for the murder of a U.S. Park Ranger.  He is being illegally held past his 30 year sentence, making him one of the longest-held political prisoners in U.S. history.

Legal Case

Veronza was convicted in the murder of a U.S. Park Ranger on the word of two government informers, both of whom received reduced sentences for other crimes by the Federal prosecutor’s office.

Herman Bell

 

Personal Background

Herman Bell was born in Mississippi and moved to Brooklyn, New York as a boy. He was a talented High School football player and won a football scholarship to the University of California in Oakland. While in Oakland, Herman joined the Black Panther Party and became active around human rights issues in the Black community.

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